The benefits of releasing your inner child.

img_0001At the beginning of the year, I found a passion in adult coloring. I admit there are people who laugh at me when they see me coloring or when I tell them I color. Those people simply can’t fathom a childish hobby having any adult health benefits. I color to reduce stress, which actually works. Coloring also has some other side benefits I never imagined.

Some people think that coloring would actually be stressful. You have to make sure to color inside the lines, pick the correct color, and the picture is finished perfectly.

If I was making a sign to show in public or attempting to impress Picasso, those things would cause me considerable stress. When I’m coloring in my personal coloring book, I have no deadline. I don’t want to impress anyone and I don’t have to adhere to specific coloring guidelines. In this activity, I’m the boss. Who cares if I make a mistake or use an unconventional color?

Sure, there are few people in the world wired like me. My brain goes 100 MPH thinking of at least three different things at the same time (six at most)and I have a penchant for reading a good book while watching TV simultaneously.

I can read your mind, dear reader. You’re thinking that such things are impossible. One person’s impossible is another woman’s daily life.

As you can imagine, meditation is impossible. I’ve tried it and all I showed for it was frustration. In a surprising twist, the act of coloring can cause a meditative state. It helps clear the mind. Being an active person, I should have known my type of meditation would require me being involved in an activity.

Coloring can also help people who suffer from anxiety.

Just like meditation, coloring also allows us to switch off our brains from other thoughts and focus only on the moment, helping to alleviate free-floating anxiety. It can be particularly effective for people who aren’t comfortable with more creatively expressive forms of art, says Berberian, “My experience has been that those participants who are more guarded find a lot of tranquility in coloring an image. It feels safer and it creates containment around their process,” she adds.

It can also be a solace for people grieving a loved one.

For Ledger and others, coloring books offer a real elixir, a way of getting past hurdles — mental, physical or both — that can’t be replicated by more-traditional approaches.

Joanne Schwandes, a 67-year-old Silver Spring resident, says that coloring books have boosted her confidence in fine motor skills weakened by a tremor in her arm. A Virginia mother says that coloring has helped her stay calm in the face of her son’s violent behavior. On one Facebook coloring group, members share their creations along with their stories of healing — using coloring as a tool against self-harming or as a way to manage the effects of physical illness or fend off depression and other difficulties.

img_0002Adult coloring books are considered a fad just like the many different diets that come and go. People roll their eyes and say it’ll never work when they’re really secretly trying it out in the privacy of their home.

Fads, or bandwagons, generally have negative connotations, an implication that a person should be ashamed to try the fad. When it comes to adult coloring books, the first reaction I get from most people is Coloring is for kids.  Young Adult books are considered for teenagers, but I see a number of adults unabashedly reading them (including me). What’s their point other than their rigid need to label activities and limit their imaginations?

So coloring books are not for everyone. Good thing there are other childish pastimes that are mentally beneficial for adults. Happy playing!

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Book Review: Witch’s Pyre (The Worldwalker Trilogy Book #3) by Josephine Angelini

51mq7tagogl-_sx331_bo1204203200_I have been waiting forever for this last installment of The Worldwalker Trilogy. As my readers know, I usually read a book in twenty-four hours. I decided to take this all in and experience the journey at a leisurely pace.

(It did not help that I also had work last week and could not stay up twenty-four hours with the hope of functioning the next day).

The writer did something that I absolutely abhor with her second book, she ended on a cliffhanger.

Lily Proctor and her coven were dropped off somewhere on the West Coast by the creepy bee Woven. They should have been dead, it was what the characters expected, it was what the readers expected (not that I wanted them to die, but it was looking dire).  Yet, that is not what happened. This forced the readers to suffer moths before we discovered why they were spared.

The coven is ushered into a seemingly prosperous city where not everything is as it appears to be. After all, it was run by the bee Woven, which readers know people and Woven of any kind do not mix.  The Governor of this prosperous city, Grace, is highly suspicious since she is the only one who has an “understanding” with them.

I like how Angelini explained the mystery of the Woven, and exactly why they are a problem.

Lily did not disappoint throughout her journey. She stayed strong and did not cross that all important line that would cause the decimation of the human race through the use of nuclear bombs.

If there is anything to learn in this trilogy, it is to not keep secrets – no matter how they might shatter the other person. Although, Lillian keeping a secret from Rowan is why we have a trilogy.

Rowan disappointed me a little from the second book into the third. He does make up for it and at least he realizes his mistakes.  However, Lily’s Tristan does not learn from his mistakes, which is the very reason he ends up dead.  At least his alternative self makes up for his shortcomings, and I was a little sorry that Lily’s Tristen died (even though it was his stupid fault).

The book did not have an “ending” per say. It was more like keeping it open for a spinoff? If this is true, I look forward to whatever the author creates next for the Worldwalker environment.

Happiness is…

img_0317At the school where I am a sub, I remember spending a year working in the library.  I had never pegged myself as a librarian when I was a teenager.  Still did not think of it when I was in college trying to envision a future career path.  Now, I am a little disappointed that I did not go out for Library Science.

Not that I am disappointed in my Masters in Literature.  Quite the opposite since I never imagined having a Masters in the first place.

Yet, that year I spent working the school library was both tiring and awesome.  The kids in my school are voracious readers and they constantly need new books.  In fact, it is encouraged that the kids tell the librarians what books they would like to see and those librarians put the titles on a Wish List.

Several boxes of new books would come in on a bi-weekly basis.  Sometimes, I would help unpack the boxes and double check the shipping lists.  I cannot tell you how sublime it was to have the new book smell waft up from a newly opened box nor the euphoria I felt running my hand over the smooth book covers.

When particular book covers caught my eye, I would pause to read the summaries of those books making my own list for future book check out, or to buy my own copy for my home library.  I may not work in the library as much these days, but I use Good Reads to keep up on the new books coming out and making my own wish list.

They have many different lists of books to choose from.  I prefer the new YA fantasy books scheduled to come out for either a new year or the rest of the year.  Each book that catches my attention is put on my Amazon wish list and I Pre Order them a week before their release date.

I may not get boxes of books like the school library.  Yet, even receiving one new book is enough to get me excited.  If only I were rich and never had to work a day in my life.  I would likely spend my days doing nothing but reading my new books and writing.  (Also, traveling through England, Ireland, Scotland, Greece, Romania, …).

If my readers are wondering, I am going to read Witch’s Pyre first.  The previous book in the trilogy ended on a cliffhanger and my readers know how much that bugs me.  Now I get to find out how the trilogy ends!

Books-2-icon

Want to see what I’m currently reading or curious about past book reviews?  

Go to my Reading Common Sense page.

 

Suggested Reading

It has been months since I updated.  Aside from super bad summer allergies along with my summertime vampirism, I have been working and August was not my best month.

Scratch that.

August was a comedy of errors Shakespeare would have loved to write a play about.  Frankly, I would love to see how he could stick a few weddings and a funeral into that comedy, but I am sure he would have found a way.  He did have legendary imagination that we are still reading his plays roughly 500 years later.

Speaking of reading and authors, I have still been reading books like they were the air that I breath (do not roll your eyes at me.  It was the best I could do on short notice).

From this moment forward, I am not going to keep a list of books to review.  I think I will review when the mood strikes.  It is simply too much pressure to keep up with it, work, and write an appropriately witty review.

I do not intend to leave my readers with nothing.  Some were likely expecting my opinion and I will give my abbreviated version for each book on my review list.  BTW I embedded the Amazon link to each book in case anyone is interested in reading  these books.

Insanity (Mad in Wonderland) by Cameron Jace (eBook box set on sale for $.99)

Pros:  Wonderfully imaginative.  I love how the author wove facts into their fantasy world. Jace was detailed in his research and it definitely shows.  A reader can tell when the author puts their heart into their written work.

Cons:  It used to be available through iBooks, but now it is only available through Amazon. If a reader has a Kindle, this is actually good news for them.  Not very good news for the rest of us.  Sure I can read Kindle books on the iPad, I just hate having eBooks stashed in several apps and getting used to several different reading formats sucks.  If it ever comes out in hardback, I would spend my hard earned cash on it, which makes this book (and likely the rest of the series) a must read.

The Glittering Court by Rachelle Mead

No pros for this.  I read it, I gave it away, it was not even good enough for me to remember months later.

A Court of Mist and Fury (A Court of Thorns and Roses Book #2) by Sarah J. Maas

Pros:  In the review post I did for A Court of Thorns and Roses, I thought Thorns and Roses was a stand alone book.  I am incredibly happy that I was wrong!  In the second book, we watch Feyre adjust to her new powers and watch her be incredibly heroic under ridiculously gross circumstances.  Who said being a heroine was clean work?  Sure I liked Tamlin as a love interest in the last book.  I should have known better.  All I can say is reread the first book very carefully.  There are clues I missed the first time around that are explained in Mist and Fury.  BTW I am on team Rhys.

Cons:  It ends on a freaking cliffhanger and we have to wait till MAY for the last book.  It is enough to make a grown woman cry – even more than I do during sad book passages.

Ruined by Amy Tintera

Did not get passed the first five pages.

The Beauty of Darkness (The Remnant Chronicles Book #3) by Mary E. Pearson

Pros:  This was not a bad Post Apocalyptic series since it managed to keep my interest until the very end.  Strong female character.

Cons:  I was disappointed in Rafe.  Would have loved to see the main character end up with the assassin.  It would have made the ending more satisfying.

Elemental Trilogy by Sherry Thomas

I liked it, it was imaginative, but it was too much like Harry Potter for me to morally keep it around.

Unhooked by Lisa Maxwell

It was okay.  I hated the best friend and it felt like it lacked that special spark that makes me feel like I am falling in love.  Either get the eBook or borrow it from the library.

Sword and Verse by Kathy MacMillan

I must admit, I had reservations about this book.  I am happy that I ignored them because this book was great!  It was imaginative, well written, and well thought out.  Even though it reads as a stand alone book, it is actually the first book in the series.  I eagerly await the second book.

The Sin Eater’s Daughter and The Sleeping Prince by Melinda Salisbury

Pros:  Wonderfully written and highly imaginative.  It reminds me of Sword and Verse by Kathy MacMillan and Crimson Bound by Rosamund Hodge.  The author creates a mythology for the world in the book and turns it upside down as the series continues.

Cons:  Yet another cliffhanger only this time, I cannot get a release date for the third book, The Scarecrow Queen.

Book Review: The Shadow Queen by C. J. Redwine

Review News

Yes. I know I voided out my promise a few months ago. I was distracted again. Better late with blog posts than never!

For those of you who are new to my blog, I’ll give you a rundown concerning my review methods. The rest of you can skip this part and get onto the review.

  1. I always look for strong female characters. In the 21st century, we should present fictional female characters who aren’t afraid to escape, fight, protect, save, and lead on their own. Relying on a man is impractical and realistically dangerous. It’s also unfair to the guys. Sure they should help in saving anyone of any gender. Helping people should be a moral obligation for any man or woman no matter how they get the job done. While this is fiction, novels have often reflected or spurred change.
  2. Strong women doesn’t mean weak male counterparts. I look for a male counterpart that can be an equal to the heroine and is not afraid to let the heroine’s character shine. If the woman saves or offers them help of any kind, the guys should be thankful and fine with it. Through Centuries and too many countries, that’s the attitude women had to take. It’s the men’s turn. They should not think having a strong woman at their side is emasculating in anyway (because that’s seriously stupid). Even if their thoughts automatically turn to that stupid patriarchal bull, they should realize their being idiots (either immediately or anytime during the story – I’m not completely strict) and correct their thinking accordingly.
  3. The story line should be reasonably palatable and the flow of the story should be sufficiently smooth. If the story line is crazy awful, I don’t care if the characters are great. Reading the book would be like listening to a song off key. Although, chances are if the story line sucks, so do the characters.
  4. There are a few miscellaneous things I’ll notice. Last post, I noticed little discrepancies regarding the sixth sense of a character. Sometimes I’ll relate situations happening in the book to things that are happening in the real world or things that happened in history. (Basically, I’m being the scholar for which I was educated. I hope you’ll indulge me).

The Shadow Queen

Amazon

Barnes and Noble

 

51lWd-Ffq9L._SX314_BO1,204,203,200_Usually, I do this part last, but I can’t help myself. I loved this book. It was an unexpected treasure for me and if I can convince anyone to read it, I hope they love it too.

The book is based off the Snow White fairytale. Before you moan and groan (like I did), it’s not another version of Tear You Apart. I never finished Tear You Apart, but I couldn’t help writing a scathing review about it.

Nor is the book another version of the Snow White character in the TV show Once Upon a Time. Mary Margaret is an okay Snow White. Yet, The Shadow Queen is so much more.

This book follows Lorelai (the Snow White character) as she and her brother rob from rich nobles allied with their evil stepmother and gives their spoils to the poor. (It sounds like a Snow White/Robin Hood hybrid. Now that I put more thought into it, there are several shades of Robin Hood throughout the book.) Lorelai’s father, the King, married Evil Queen Irena when Lorelai was a young girl. While the mother/daughter relationship between Lorelai and the Queen began happily, it soured when Lorelai discovered the Queen’s evil intentions: To kill the King and take over the kingdom. Killing Lorelai and the young prince were part of Irena’s diabolical plan, Lorelai managed to thwart the Queen using her special powers.

Lorelai always intended to go back to the castle to overthrow the Queen, but she planned it later in life after she had mastered her powers. Yet, the kingdom couldn’t wait. Queen Irena’s dark powers were draining the life out of the land and the people were starving. Lorelai would have to overthrow the Queen at the tender age of seventeen.

The Land of Ravenspire isn’t the only one in peril. The neighboring kingdom of Eldr has a magical troll problem. With the King, Queen, and crown Prince recently murdered, the crown falls to the young Prince Kol to lead the kingdom. He is desperate to save his people and decides to request help from Queen Irena in exchange for food for her starving kingdom.

Kol soon discovers the Queen cares nothing for her people and everything for destroying a certain thief. He enters into a blood pact with the Queen where he promises to kill the thief in exchange for the power to imprison the magical trolls.

Kol learns the truth behind the thief and switches sides despite the intense pain from the Queen’s blood pact.

First, I would like to say there is rape imagery in this book. Rape is not an act done out of uncontrollable desire. It really doesn’t matter what the victim wears or how they act. Rape is an act of power. The perpetrator is exerting their control over their victim.

After the violent act, most victims suffer from Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). One of the possible symptoms (the symptoms differ and a person can experience one or multiple symptoms) involves reliving the event. This trauma is a way the perpetrators continue to control their victims.

When Kol attempts to defy Queen Irena and the blood pact, she takes his human heart causing him to lose control over his killer dragon instincts and takes away his ability to change into a dragon. She essentially took away his power when she took his heart and has control over him through the thorn necklace signifying their original pact.

The necklace allows Irena to control him, taunting his beast so he goes into sporadic fits of rage that could ultimately kill Lorelai.

Second, Queen Irena is a drug dealer. The book doesn’t blatantly say she’s a drug dealer. Although, it’s fairly obvious. Through the book, a reader finds out about Irena’s black apples (like the one that’s on the cover) and describes compliant subjects walking around with vacant looks and black goo around their mouths.

The way Queen Irena makes the black apples is a metaphor for drug bosses and how they use their employees. I’m not going to describe it here. The scene is rather disturbing.

At this point, you’re likely wondering why I like this book. Trust me. The heroine, Lorelai, is awesome and a very strong main character. Kol has his faults, but makes up for it through the book. He’s a very worthy love interest.

There is one bad thing I can say about this book. A book can’t be completely perfect. Not even authors think their work is perfect. I loved Lorelai’s brother and the author saw fit to kill him. Talk about devastation. I can see why the author did it. The brother’s death makes the reader even more emotionally invested in the book. I’m just an unapologetic happily ever after person.

Either way, I highly recommend this book and it has a place of honor on my bookshelf

Future Book Reviews

***Will not be reviewed in this order.Books-2-icon

  • Insanity (Mad in Wonderland) by Cameron Jace
  • The Glittering Court by Rachelle Mead (April 5th)
  • A Court of Mist and Fury (A Court of Thorns and Roses Book #2) by Sarah J. Maas (May 3rd)
  • Ruined by Amy Tintera (May 3rd)
  • Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts I & II by J. K. Rowling (July 31st)
  • The Beauty of Darkness (The Remnant Chronicles Book #3) by Mary E. Pearson (August 2nd)
  • Witch’s Pyre (The Worldwalker Trilogy Book #3) by Josephine Angelini
  • Elemental Trilogy by Sherry Thomas
    • The Burning Sky
    • The Perilous Sea
    • The Immortal Heights
  • Unhooked by Lisa Maxwell
  • Sword and Verse by Kathy MacMillan
  • The Grisha Trilogy by Leigh Bardugo
    • Ruin and Rising

Want to see what I’m currently reading or curious about past book reviews?  

Go to my Reading Common Sense page.

Book Review: Burning Glass by Kathryn Purdie

Review News

 

If you’ve noticed, I’m putting out one book review a day until I get caught up with them.  Recent (maybe not the most recent) books are reviewed first.  Then I’ll get to the older books I’ve already read.

Burning Glass

Amazon

Barnes and Noble

 

Burning_Glass_coverAmazon described this book a cross between Red Queen and Shadow and Bone.  I’ve read both and I would have to disagree with at least one.

Red Queen is a post apocalyptic novel that has no relevant relation to Burning Glass.  I have no clue why they made the reference, unless they were comparing the complicated love triangle between a girl and two brothers.  If that’s the case, I’ve already covered the fallacy of comparing one small aspect of a novel with another in my Red Queen review.

Shadow and Bone is a better comparison because Shadow and Bone and Burning Glass are steeped in worlds based off Russian culture.  Also, both heroines struggle to control extraordinary powers while battling handsome, crazy evil dudes who think they’re doing good when they’re actually greedy.

The truth is, this book doesn’t have a second adequate comparison.  At least, none that I’ve read so far.

Sonya, our lovely heroine, has spent most of her young life ducking the Riaznin government.  She has an empathic gift, which means she can sense other people’s emotions.  The government uses such people to sense threats to the Emperor.  This position is called Sovereign Auraseer.

This novel starts after Sonya is captured and sent to a special convent that trains seers to control their gifts so they can be used for the good of the country.  A few months into her stay, tragic circumstances made Sonya the new Sovereign Auraseer.

Politics and court intrigue begin when Prince Anton does a little coup planning during their journey.  He doesn’t want Sonya to know, but he’s not exactly smooth with the subterfuge.

Anton and Emperor Valko were separated and raised apart as young children.  Each were taught to be emperor of the land, Valko became emperor because he was the oldest.  This is the basis for the strained relationship between the brothers.

Sonya’s situation brings her into the brother’s strained relationship.  Valko sees her as an understanding confidant among people who couldn’t possibly understand his situation.  While he doesn’t perceive Sonya as an equal nor does he entertain the possibility of raising her station through marriage (that’s just preposterous to marry a commoner with no dowery), he mistakes maniacal dependance for love.

Meanwhile, Anton, the brother Sonya is actually in love with (or so she guesses), exhibits contradicting emotions whenever Sonya is around.  One minute he’s hot, the next he’s cold, and most of the time he avoids her so she can’t read him at all.

As Sonya attempts to control her powers, she must make a moral decision between duty and revolution.  The first will lead to madness and possible destruction of the country.  The other will lead to love and chaos.

First, I have a small technical issue with the book before going into my critique of the characters.

The author’s mistaken use of the word aura to describe Sonya’s abilities.  Purdie confuses the term’s public use as an instinct most humans possess.  For example, When Jane stepped closer to Sam, she could feel is tense aura.

To describe a highly developed sixth sense few people possess, she should have used the word empath.  Aura, in terms of a developed sixth sense, has everything to do with sight.  Someone who has this sixth sense views the energy surrounding each person in terms of colors.  These colors depict what a person is feeling or the state of a person’s health.  Hence, Purdie’s term Auraseer.

The term Purdie should have used for the Auraseers is Empathics.  An empath – person who can feel another person’s emotions in depth – is a more apt description of Sonya’s powers.

I know, it’s a little nitpickie and a debatable topic, but I had to get that out or obsess about it later.

Now to the characters!

I liked Sonya as a heroine.  She was thrown a quagmire of difficult situations and managed to come out stronger for the experience.  Anyone who can handle those two brothers without committing suicide and keeping her sanity is virtually superhuman.  Someone weaker would have given into the Emperor and ended up lost within his emotions.

Valko was a complicated character.  Like Sonya, a reader doesn’t know what to make of him when he’s introduced.  Yet, he allowed greed to make him mentally unstable and blamed everyone else for his actions instead of owning his insane greed.  As an older brother with the weight of a country on his shoulders, I found him very childish, weak, and manipulative.  Furthermore, his irresistible vortex of emotions had a hint of sleaze throughout the book.

Anton was only slightly better than his brother.  He obviously would make a better emperor because he cares for his people.  Unfortunately, the man is confused when it comes to trust.  In my opinion, he trusts normal people easily.  When it comes to a Sonya, he has trust issues.  The author explained this little issue between Anton and Sonya by blaming his upbringing and basically saying he had trust issues with everyone.  That was an extremely faulty explanation.  While his brother didn’t own his greed, Anton didn’t own the fact that he thought Sonya was mirroring his own emotions.  That her love for him wasn’t actually hers.

Honestly, there were parts of the book where I wanted to kick one or both of the brothers in the nuts.  That’s how frustrating they were.

Despite my frustration, technical pet peeves, and wondering why Sonya doesn’t walk away from both brothers, I liked the book.   It started slow.  The story picked up in Chapter Five and I couldn’t put it down after that.  (Usually, I only give a book three chapters, but these chapters were relatively short, which is why I stuck with it longer).  It has earned it’s rightful place on my bookshelf.

I don’t think this book is the start of a series.  Although, I said the same thing about A Court of Thorns and Roses and it’s sequel, A Court of Mist and Fury is due out May 3rd.

Future Book Reviews

***Will not be reviewed in this order.Books-2-icon

  • Insanity (Mad in Wonderland) by Cameron Jace
  • The Glittering Court by Rachelle Mead (April 5th)
  • A Court of Mist and Fury (A Court of Thorns and Roses Book #2) by Sarah J. Maas (May 3rd)
  • Ruined by Amy Tintera (May 3rd)
  • Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts I & II by J. K. Rowling (July 31st)
  • The Beauty of Darkness (The Remnant Chronicles Book #3) by Mary E. Pearson (August 2nd)
  • Witch’s Pyre (The Worldwalker Trilogy Book #3) by Josephine Angelini
  • Elemental Trilogy by Sherry Thomas
    • The Burning Sky
    • The Perilous Sea
    • The Immortal Heights
  • Unhooked by Lisa Maxwell
  • Sword and Verse by Kathy MacMillan
  • The Shadow Queen by C. J. Redwine
  • The Grisha Trilogy by Leigh Bardugo
    • Ruin and Rising

Want to see what I’m currently reading or curious about past book reviews?  

Go to my Reading Common Sense page.

Book Review: Glass Sword (Red Queen Book #2) by Victoria Aveyard

Review News

***For those of you who get my e-mailed post:  Yes, I did it again.  Sorry about that!

For the first book in the Red Queen series, I read it, had a slight interest in it, and then gave it away to a student who would appreciate it more. I’m not big on post apocalyptic books. Yet, this had some magical (psychic?) element to it, that made it interesting for me. While the first book was not a keeper (I believe I said that the second book would make or break it for me), I gave the second book a try.

Glass Sword (Red Queen Book #2)

Amazon

Barnes and Noble

Glass_Sword_coverMare Barrow, our intrepid heroine, was on a underground train with members of a secret organization, her best friend, her supposedly dead brother, and the framed former prince. This is where the second book picks up.

They stop briefly at the ruins of a city that were considered uninhabitable due to radiation. (The books don’t come out and say radiation, but it’s fairly obvious). Unfortunately, their flight from the capital isn’t finished. Maven, the usurper of the crown, is determined to catch Mare and Tiberias, the elder brother he framed. He also wants to crush the resistance, but it seems like an afterthought since his main goal is capturing the aforementioned individuals.

Once our main characters along with some of the resistance escape capture, they run to a remote island that’s used as a base for the resistance. The resistance leader, Farley, is nearly usurped by a General from another country – who was supposedly there to help the resistance. The General happens to be her own father.

He manages to capture Mare and Tiberias since he thinks that anyone with powers is an eminent threat. With the help of Mare’s best friend, Kilorn, the key characters in the book manage to escape.

Where to start?

Let’s start with the main character. It’s hard to be mad at Mare for the situation on the island. When you’re outnumbered, it doesn’t matter if you have powers or not. She was up against a huge bigot, the General, who was afraid of anyone with abilities. While his daughter Farley had no abilities of her own, she was sympathetic towards Mare and Tiberias. In fact, she actually saw them as an asset.  Hence, the General deemed her a threat and threw her in a cell.  I find that particularly cold.  Instead of listening to his own daughter, he has her drugged and thrown in a cell with the help of Kilorn.

At first, it’s easy to hate Kilorn.  He seems like a jealous guy with daddy issues and he uses the General to fill in as dad.  Then I found out he was playing a part and he’s an instant genius.  In my opinion, that’s good writing on the author’s part.

Through the first half of the book, Mare was keeping in mind that she should trust no one. Not even her best friend or brother, yet she was having a hard time with the concept, which seems to have worked in her favor. Since Farley, Kilorn, and Shade (her brother) were the people to get her and Tiberias out of their cell.

The book was good, descriptive, and was action packed, I won’t continue on with the series. There’s something about it that doesn’t interest me. It’s not the post apocalyptic aspect of the story. I have a problem with the constant helplessness I feel for Mare, which is why I particularly hate the end of this book.

It drives me crazy when an author ends a book on a cliffhanger. I don’t care if it’s the middle book in a series. Don’t leave me hanging for a year. There’s always a way to write the end of a book that gives the readers closure and has them eagerly awaiting for the next book in the series without annoying them with cliffhangers.  Give us a break, authors!   Yet, Aveyard came up with an ending I hate even more.

Not only does she leave her readers hanging, she leaves Mare in an absolutely horrible situation that makes a reader (or just me) angry more than anything.

If post apocalyptic genre cliffhangers and helpless situations are your thing, I recommend this book. If you’re a curious passerby, then keep walking!

Future Book Reviews

***Will not be reviewed in this order.Books-2-icon

  • Insanity (Mad in Wonderland) by Cameron Jace
  • Burning Glass by Kathryn Purdie
  • The Glittering Court by Rachelle Mead (April 5th)
  • A Court of Mist and Fury (A Court of Thorns and Roses Book #2) by Sarah J. Maas (May 3rd)
  • Ruined by Amy Tintera (May 3rd)
  • Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts I & II by J. K. Rowling (July 31st)
  • The Beauty of Darkness (The Remnant Chronicles Book #3) by Mary E. Pearson (August 2nd)
  • Witch’s Pyre (The Worldwalker Trilogy Book #3) by Josephine Angelini
  • Elemental Trilogy by Sherry Thomas
    • The Burning Sky
    • The Perilous Sea
    • The Immortal Heights
  • Unhooked by Lisa Maxwell
  • Sword and Verse by Kathy MacMillan
  • The Shadow Queen by C. J. Redwine
  • The Grisha Trilogy by Leigh Bardugo
    • Ruin and Rising

Want to see what I’m currently reading or curious about past book reviews?  

Go to my Reading Common Sense page.